Tolerant people of the past: Mother Theresa

Mother Teresa of Calcutta (26.8.1919-5.9.1997)...

Mother Teresa of Calcutta (26.8.1919-5.9.1997); at a pro-life meeting in 1986 in Bonn, Germany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mother Theresa

I can remember her well, the old wrinkly lady on tv. By the time I had the maturity to appreciate her work wholeheartedly she was no longer officially in office. But she had such a charisma and noble vibe around her that she was still quite often in the news, helping in one of her missions, trying to make the life of the poorest of the poor a little bit better. She did not do this for fame or money: it was her life’s mission.

 

 

 

She was the recipient of the 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. She refused the conventional banquet given to laureates, and asked that the $192.000 funds be given to the poor in India. Mother Theresa stated that earthly rewards were important only if they helped her help the world’s needy. All over the world she worked hard to battle for people that needed support. Even though she was a devout Christian, her work transgressed over the boundaries of religious teachings. Teresa received Vatican permission on 7 October 1950 to start the diocesan congregation that would become the Missionaries of Charity. Its mission was to care for, in her own words, “the hungry, the naked, the homeless, the crippled, the blind, the lepers, all those people who feel unwanted, unloved, uncared for throughout society, people that have become a burden to the society and are shunned by everyone.”

Her actions aimed at the poorest of the poor, but she was not blind for the difficult problems that are common in western civilized societies. I will not state that there is no poverty in Western Society, however the problems are significantly different from the poorest people in for example India. Recognizing this difference in her Nobel price speech Mother Theresa stated:

“Around the world, not only in the poor countries, but I found the poverty of the West so much more difficult to remove. When I pick up a person from the street, hungry, I give him a plate of rice, a piece of bread, I have satisfied. I have removed that hunger. But a person that is shut out, that feels unwanted, unloved, terrified, the person that has been thrown out from society—that poverty is so hurtable and so much, and I find that very difficult.”

The life of Mother Theresa shows devotion and action for people that need it most. Be more like her, and be kinder to people that are not as fortunate as you are.

How did the life of Mother Theresa influence you? What is it about her that you remember the most? And how do you see her life from the perspective of tolerance?

I’d love your feedback. Also if you have a suggestion to spot someone in the spotlight let me know!

Series: Tolerant people of the past:

Charlie Chaplin

 

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4 Comments

Filed under Asia, Tolerant people of the past

4 responses to “Tolerant people of the past: Mother Theresa

  1. Moter terresa you are the best

  2. Pingback: Four words « McCauley Fowler

  3. Mother Theresa painted this on the wall of the Childrens home in Calcutta. It says it all I think.

    The Final Analysis

    People are often unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered;
…Forgive them anyway!
    If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives;
…Be kind anyway!
    If you are successful, you will win some false friends and some true enemies;
…Succeed anyway!
    If you are honest and frank, people may cheat you;
…Be honest and frank anyway!
    What you spend years building, someone could destroy overnight;
…Build anyway!
    If you find serenity and happiness, they may be jealous;
…Be happy anyway!
    The good you do today, people will often forget tomorrow;
…Do good anyway!
    Give the world the best you have, and it may never be enough;
…Give the world the best you’ve got anyway!
    You see, in the final analysis, it is between you and God;
It was never between you and them anyway.

    Mother Theresa

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